Galaxies http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/ Galaxies NGC 891 Edge on Spiral Galaxy in Andromeda 28 x 300 Sec subs Celestron 9.25 SCT with 6.6 focal reducer Atlas mount using EQMOD Q453HR Camera Light Pollution Filter Guided with a 80ST/DSI using PHD Images acquired using Nebulosity Stacked with Deep Sky Stacker Processed with Nebulosity http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=14694241 14694241 The Sombero - M104 Located in Virgo the Sombero galaxy is named because of resemblance to the famous Mexican hat. At a distance of about 30 million light years it rotates at a speed of about 26,000 miles an hour around the center. This is classified as a Unbarred Spiral Galaxy. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=20740864 20740864 Hercules Galaxies Cluster Although not very pretty picture, this image shows a cluster of galaxies in the constellation Hercules. These galaxies are interacting and move as a group. The most amazing thing about this photo is the distance to those galaxies. The group is about 500 MILLION light years away. This is the farthest object I have imaged. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=31826603 31826603 First Photo with the my Megrez 90 Refractor Here is the first light with my new Megrez 90 scope. It has the Focal reducer/field flattner so it is operating at f/5.5. The image is only 9 5 min exposures and is extremely stretched and cropped. The processing is not great but not all that bad for a first light. Guided with a 9.25 SCT, DSI Pro and PHD. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=30134665 30134665 M81 and M82 Galaxies Wide field of M81 and M82 galaxies M81 (larger galaxy on the right) was first discovered in first discovered by Johann Elert Bode in 1774. Consequently, the galaxy is sometimes referred to as "Bode's Galaxy". Located about 11.7 million light years from earth in the constellation Ursa Major (the Big Dipper). It is the main galaxy in the "M81Galaxy Group" of galaxies that contains about 34 galaxies and does not include our own Milky Way. The smaller M82 galaxy in the upper left is interacting with M81 to a large extent. You can see hints of red spikes in the middle of the image which is a result of new star formation. M82 is about the same distance away from us as M81 and the two are separated by 130 light years. How many galaxies can you find in this image? How about 15? Technical Data: Megrez 90 operated a f/5.5 ST80 guide scope Nebulosity capture PHD guide Atlas mount Processed with Deepsky stacker and Photoshop CS2 http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=31322916 31322916 The Triangulium Galaxy - M33 This galaxy is located in its Triangulum constellation at a distance of 28 million light years. This is a great example of a Grand Spiral Design galaxy. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=20741378 20741378 Wide field image of M101 M101 is the Pinwheel Galaxy. Discovered in 1781 by Pierre Méchain. It is located in the constellation of Ursa Major (Big Dipper). It is about twice as large as the Milky Way and is located 27 million light years away. Technical Information: Megrez 90 Telescope QHY8 Camera 9.25 SCT used as guide scope Nebulosity (Image Capture) PHD Guiding Hypertuned Atlas mount 39 x 5 min exposure http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=30301328 30301328 Markarian's Chain This image shows the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies known as Markarian's Chain. The chain is highlighted on the upper right with two large but featureless lenticular galaxies, M84 and M86, and connects to the large spiral on the lower left, M88. Prominent on the lower right but not part of Markarian's Chain is the giant elliptical galaxy M87. The home Virgo Cluster is the nearest cluster of galaxies, contains over 2000 galaxies, and has a noticeable gravitational pull on the galaxies of the Local Group of Galaxies surrounding our Milky Way Galaxy. The center of the Virgo Cluster is located about 70 million light years away toward the constellation of Virgo. At least seven galaxies in the chain appear to move coherently, although others appear to be superposed by chance. (description) taken from APOD, March 16 2005) Technical Data: Megrez 90 operated a f/5.5 ST80 guide scope Nebulosity capture PHD guide Atlas mount Processed with Deepsky stacker and Photoshop CS2 http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=30896458 30896458 Close up of M101 M101 is the Pinwheel Galaxy. Discovered in 1781 by Pierre Méchain. It is located in the constellation of Ursa Major (Big Dipper). It is about twice as large as the Milky Way and is located 27 million light years away. Technical Information: Celestron 9.25 SCT at f/6.3 Guided with Megrez 90 Telescope QHY8 Camera Celestron 9.25 SCT at f/6.3 Nebulosity (Image Capture) PHD Guiding Hypertuned Atlas mount 39 x 5 min exposure http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=38850298 38850298 The Whirlpool Galaxy This is actually two galaxies that have pasted near each other resulting in the tail that appears to connect the two. The larger galaxy is located about 37 million light years from earth in the constellation Canes Venatici. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=20741379 20741379 Bodes Nebula Discovered by Johann Elert Bode in 1774. At first it was thought to be a simple cloud of gas. Located in the constellation Ursa Major (the Big Dipper). Easily seen through small telescopes it appears as a fuzzy star, with bigger scopes the spiral arms appear. The galaxy is located approximately 11.8 million light years. This image is the first in a series of collecting and stacking. As time goes on data will be added and better resolution/contrast will be seen. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=20775414 20775414 Bodes Nebula 39 x 5 min exposures. Taken with: Celestron 9.25 SCT telescope at f/6.3 Q453 Camera Atlas mount Nebulosity 2.0 Guided with ST80 using PHD Software http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=21492263 21492263 Bodes Nebula All images processed together. 90 x 5 minutes = 7.5 hours of imaging over three nights. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=22118829 22118829 Close up of Bodes Nebula http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=22118830 22118830 The Whirlpool Galaxy The Whirlpool Galaxy (also known as Messier 51a, M51a, or NGC 5194) is an interacting grand-design spiral galaxy located at a distance of approximately 23 million light-years in the constellation Canes Venatici. It is one of the most famous spiral galaxies in the sky.[citation needed] The galaxy and its companion (NGC 5195) are easily observed by amateur astronomers, and the two galaxies may even be seen with binoculars. The Whirlpool Galaxy is also a popular target for professional astronomers, who study it to further understanding of galaxy structure (particularly structure associated with the spiral arms) and galaxy interactions. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=36601456 36601456 Andromeda Galaxy The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. It is the nearest spiral galaxy to our own, the Milky Way. As it is visible as a faint smudge on a moonless night, it is one of the farthest objects visible to the naked eye, and can be seen even from urban areas with binoculars. It is named after the princess Andromeda in Greek mythology. Andromeda is the largest galaxy of the Local Group, which consists of the Andromeda Galaxy, the Milky Way Galaxy, the Triangulum Galaxy, and about 30 other smaller galaxies. The 2006 observations by the Spitzer Space Telescope revealed that M31 contains one trillion (1012) stars, greatly exceeding the number of stars in our own galaxy. While the 2006 estimates put the mass of the Milky Way to be ~80% of the mass of Andromeda, which is estimated to be 7.1 × 1011 solar masses, a 2009 study concluded that Andromeda and the Milky Way are about equal in mass. At an apparent magnitude of 4.4, the Andromeda Galaxy is notable for being one of the brightest Messier objects,[10] making it easily visible to the naked eye even when viewed from areas with moderate light pollution. Although it appears more than six times as wide as the full moon when photographed through a larger telescope, only the brighter central region is visible with the naked eye. Combination 140 x 3 min images QHY8 Camera Willams Optics Megrez 80 Telescope @ f/5.4 Atlas mount ST 80 Guide scope/DSI/PHD guilding http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=49695899 49695899 Triangulum Galaxy The Triangulum Galaxy (also known as Messier 33 or NGC 598) is a spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light-years away in the constellation Triangulum. The galaxy is also sometimes informally referred to as the Pinwheel Galaxy by some amateur astronomy references[6] and in some public outreach websites.[7] However, the SIMBAD Astronomical Database, a professional astronomy database that contains formal designations for astronomical objects, indicates that the name "Pinwheel Galaxy" is used to refer to Messier 101,[8] and several other amateur astronomy resources and other public outreach websites also identify Messier 101 by that name.[9][10] With a diameter of about 50,000 light-years, it is the third largest galaxy in the Local Group, a group of galaxies that also contains the Milky Way Galaxy and the Andromeda Galaxy, and it may be a gravitationally bound companion of the Andromeda Galaxy. The Pisces Dwarf (LGS 3), one of the small Local Group member galaxies, is possibly a satellite of Triangulum. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=52140867 52140867 NGC 891 NGC 891 is an edge on unbarred spiral galaxy about 30 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. It was discovered by William Herschel on October 6 1784. The galaxy is a member of the NGC 1023 group of galaxies in the Local Supercluster. THis image was taken under a full moon so it actually turned out better than expected. Taken with the 9.25 SCT. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=51166405 51166405 Triangulum Galaxy from a dark site The Triangulum Galaxy (also known as Messier 33 or NGC 598) is a spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light-years away in the constellation Triangulum. The galaxy is also sometimes informally referred to as the Pinwheel Galaxy by some amateur astronomy references[6] and in some public outreach websites.[7] However, the SIMBAD Astronomical Database, a professional astronomy database that contains formal designations for astronomical objects, indicates that the name "Pinwheel Galaxy" is used to refer to Messier 101,[8] and several other amateur astronomy resources and other public outreach websites also identify Messier 101 by that name.[9][10] With a diameter of about 50,000 light-years, it is the third largest galaxy in the Local Group, a group of galaxies that also contains the Milky Way Galaxy and the Andromeda Galaxy, and it may be a gravitationally bound companion of the Andromeda Galaxy. The Pisces Dwarf (LGS 3), one of the small Local Group member galaxies, is possibly a satellite of Triangulum. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=52854474 52854474 Messier 109 Messier 109 (also known as NGC 3992) is a barred spiral galaxy approximately 46 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. Messier 109 was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1781. A barred spiral galaxy is a spiral galaxy with a central bar-shaped structure composed of stars. Bars are found in approximately half of all spiral galaxies. Bars generally affect both the motions of stars and interstellar gas within spiral galaxies and can affect spiral arms as well. Captured using: 9.25 SCT with 6.3 focal reducer Atlas Mount QHY8 Imaging Camera http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=60743144 60743144 The Whirlpool - Second Photo The Whirlpool Galaxy (also known as Messier 51a, M51a, or NGC 5194) is an interacting grand-design spiral galaxy located at a distance of approximately 23 million light-years in the constellation Canes Venatici. It is one of the most famous spiral galaxies in the sky.[citation needed] The galaxy and its companion (NGC 5195) are easily observed by amateur astronomers, and the two galaxies may even be seen with binoculars. The Whirlpool Galaxy is also a popular target for professional astronomers, who study it to further understanding of galaxy structure (particularly structure associated with the spiral arms) and galaxy interactions. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=72492142 72492142 The Blackeye Galaxy The Black Eye Galaxy (also called Sleeping Beauty Galaxy; designated Messier 64, M64, or NGC 4826) was discovered by Edward Pigott in March 1779, and independently by Johann Elert Bode in April of the same year, as well as by Charles Messier in 1780. It has a spectacular dark band of absorbing dust in front of the galaxy's bright nucleus, giving rise to its nicknames of the "Black Eye" or "Evil Eye" galaxy. M64 is well known among amateur astronomers because of its appearance in small telescopes. A collision of two galaxies has left a merged star system with an unusual appearance as well as bizarre internal motions. Astronomers believe that the oppositely rotating gas arose when M64 absorbed a satellite galaxy that collided with it, perhaps more than one billion years ago. Active formation of new stars is occurring in the shear region where the oppositely rotating gases collide, are compressed, and contract. Particularly noticeable in the image are hot, blue young stars that have just formed, along with pink clouds of glowing hydrogen gas that fluoresce when exposed to ultraviolet light from newly formed stars. It is approximately 17 million light years from earth. (from Wikipedia) This is a very difficult object to capture. It was taken at the highest focal ratio my scope is capable of and requires excellent tracking and good skies. Taken with: 9.25 SCT at f/10 Atlas mount QHY8 Guided with: ST80/DSI Software: Nebulosity PHD DeepSkyStacker Photoshop http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=70520245 70520245 The Whirlpool Galaxy The Whirlpool Galaxy (also known as Messier 51a, M51a, or NGC 5194) is an interacting grand-design spiral galaxy located at a distance of approximately 23 million light-years in the constellation Canes Venatici. It is one of the most famous spiral galaxies in the sky.[citation needed] The galaxy and its companion (NGC 5195) are easily observed by amateur astronomers, and the two galaxies may even be seen with binoculars. The Whirlpool Galaxy is also a popular target for professional astronomers, who study it to further understanding of galaxy structure (particularly structure associated with the spiral arms) and galaxy interactions. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=73584166 73584166 2010 Messier 101 M101 is the Pinwheel Galaxy. Discovered in 1781. It is located in the constellation of Ursa Major (Big Dipper). It is about twice as large as the Milky Way and is located 27 million light years away. Technical Information: 9.25 SCT at f/6.3 QHY8 Camera ST80 used as guide scope Nebulosity (Image Capture) PHD Guiding Hypertuned Atlas mount DSS stacking/Photoshop Processing http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=74686652 74686652 The Sunflower Galaxy The Sunflower Galaxy (also known as Messier 63, M63, or NGC 5055) is an Spiral galaxy in the Canes Venatici constellation. It is a Spiral galaxy, consisting of a central disc surrounded by many short spiral arm segments. The Sunflower Galaxy is part of the M51 Group, a group of galaxies that also includes the Whirlpool Galaxy (M51). The Sunflower Galaxy was discovered by Pierre Méchain on June 14, 1779. The galaxy was then listed by Charles Messier as object 63 in the Messier Catalogue. In the mid-1800s, Lord Rosse identified spiral structure within the galaxy, making this one of the first galaxies in which such structure was identified. Taken from Wikipedia Equipment 9.25 SCT at f/6.3 QHY8 Camera Atlas mount ST80/DSI guiding Nebulosity capture PHD guide DSS stack and Photoshop processing http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=74687714 74687714 The Whale and Hockey Stick Galaxy The Whale Galaxy (the one at the top) storted wedge shape gives it the appearance of a herring or whale. If you closely you will see it is actually two galaxies. One is the long thin one and the other is just above it and looks like a fuzzy star. The galaxy at the bottom is also actually two galaxies. The are in the process of merging in to a single and in the process creating a trail of stars and gas. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=78447615 78447615 The Fireworks Galaxy NGC 6946, (also known as the Fireworks Galaxy and Arp 29), is an intermediate spiral galaxy about 10 million light-years away, on the border between the constellations Cepheus and Cygnus. It was discovered by William Herschel on September 9, 1798. NGC 6946 is highly obscured by interstellar matter of the Milky Way galaxy, as it is quite close to the galactic plane. Nine supernovae (SN 1917A, SN 1939C, SN 1948B, SN 1968D, SN 1969P, SN 1980K, SN 2002hh, SN 2004et, and SN 2008S) have been observed in NGC 6946. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=79295069 79295069 NGC 4725 While most spiral galaxies, including our own Milky Way, have two or more spiral arms, NGC 4725 seems to have only one. In this sharp color image, the solo spira mirabilis is tightly wound, traced by bluish, newborn star clusters. The odd galaxy also sports obscuring dust lanes, a prominent ring, and a yellowish central bar structure composed of an older population of stars. NGC 4725 is over 100 thousand light-years across and lies 41 million light-years away in the well-groomed constellation Coma Berenices. Computer simulations of the formation of single spiral arms suggest that they can be either leading or trailing arms with respect to a galaxy's overall rotation. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=79296706 79296706 The Firework Galaxy NGC 6946, (also known as the Fireworks Galaxy and Arp 29), is an intermediate spiral galaxy about 10 million light-years away, on the border between the constellations Cepheus and Cygnus. It was discovered by William Herschel on September 9, 1798. NGC 6946 is highly obscured by interstellar matter of the Milky Way galaxy, as it is quite close to the galactic plane. Nine supernovae (SN 1917A, SN 1939C, SN 1948B, SN 1968D, SN 1969P, SN 1980K, SN 2002hh, SN 2004et, and SN 2008S) have been observed in NGC 6946. Taken with 9.25 SCT at f/6.3 using a QHY8 camera. All mounted on an Atlas mount. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=82108774 82108774 The Firework Galaxy version II NGC 6946, (also known as the Fireworks Galaxy and Arp 29), is an intermediate spiral galaxy about 10 million light-years away, on the border between the constellations Cepheus and Cygnus. It was discovered by William Herschel on September 9, 1798. NGC 6946 is highly obscured by interstellar matter of the Milky Way galaxy, as it is quite close to the galactic plane. Nine supernovae (SN 1917A, SN 1939C, SN 1948B, SN 1968D, SN 1969P, SN 1980K, SN 2002hh, SN 2004et, and SN 2008S) have been observed in NGC 6946. Taken with 9.25 SCT at f/6.3 using a QHY8 camera. All mounted on an Atlas mount. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=82938857 82938857 Twisted Galaxies NGC 3718, NGC 3729 and friends are a two groups of interacting galaxies. The closest are NGC 3718 and NGC 3729 at a distance of a mere 52 million light years away. It is thought that the two galaxies are interacting thought they are separated by 150 thousand light years. The smaller galaxies toward the bottom of the photo is known as the Hickson Group 56 and consists of five separate galaxies. These galaxies are located some 350 million light years distant! I believe this the first photo I have taken that show two separate interacting groups. Taken with my SCT at f/6.3. http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=83564559 83564559 The Deer Lick Galaxy or NGC 7331 NGC 7331 is a spiral galaxy about 40 million light-years away in the constellation Pegasus. It was discovered by William Herschel in 1784.[citation needed] NGC 7331 is the brightest member of NGC 7331 Group of galaxies. The galaxy is similar in size and structure to the galaxy we inhabit, and is often referred to as "the Milky Way's twin",although recent discoveries regarding the structure of the Milky Way may call this similarity into doubt. In spiral galaxies the central bulge typically co-rotates with the disk but the bulge in the galaxy NGC 7331 is rotating in the opposite direction to the rest of the disk. The current bulge may have formed from in falling material, however if it has been there since the formation of the galaxy then it would be difficult to explain how such a situation arose. (Taken from Wikipedia) 39x5min 9.25 Celeastron SCT at f/6.3 QHY8 OAG with DSI Nebulosity, PHD, DSS, PS http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=98592819 98592819 TheTriangulum Galaxy The Triangulum Galaxy is a spiral galaxy at approximately 3 million light years (ly) distance in the constellation Triangulum. It is catalogued as Messier 33 or NGC 598, and is sometimes informally referred to as the Pinwheel Galaxy, a moniker it shares with Messier 101. The Triangulum Galaxy is the third-largest member of the Local Group of galaxies, which includes the Milky Way Galaxy, the Andromeda Galaxy and about 30 other smaller galaxies. It is one of the most distant permanent objects that can be viewed with the naked eye. Technical Celestron 9.25 SCT at f/6.3 QHY8 Camera, Celestron LPS OAG guiding Nebulosity, PHD, DSS, Photoshop 35x5min, http://www.edbianchina.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=99460223 99460223